6 Places to Use Keywords to Make Your Content More Visible

Keywords are the terms your ideal client is plugging into Google or another search engine when she needs an answer.  The right keywords make your LearnDash courses and content easier to find when leads are searching for what you’ve got to offer…. and they keep you on track and focused on what you should be providing to your customers.

just look at this post.  Root keywords like: niches, niche markets,  are examples of keywords that we are using.  Dig a bit deeper and you’ll see keyword phrases, like “pick the right niche” virtual assistants” and sentences that include “how to …. ”.

Still Need to pick a niche and find the right keywords for that niche?  Take some time now and learn how to pick the right niche before you get started with  your content.

Knowing the keywords you’d like to be known for is critical for attracting “organic” traffic to your site, but that’s only one part of the equation. You also have to use your keywords strategically.

1. Page Titles or Subjects

If you’re tempted to use cute, clever blog post titles, keep this in mind: The subject is the keyword field to which Google and other search providers give the most weight. Don’t waste that space with a clever turn of phrase. Instead, be clear and concise, and say exactly what your article or post is about.

2. Sub-Headings

Everyone today is in a hurry. We rarely read an entire article from start to finish. Instead, we “skim” it for the most important points before deciding if we want to invest the time in a more complete reading. If your post or article is more than a few paragraphs long, be sure to include sub-headings to give the skimmers an overview.

Not only are you providing time-pressed visitors a birds-eye view but sub-headings also tell the search engines what your content is about. Be sure to use your keywords strategically in your sub-headings so Google (and others) know how to classify your posts.

3. Image Titles and File Names

Search for nearly anything on Google, and you’ll see images appear at the top of the search results. These images will almost always have file names and titles that correspond to the keyword you’ve searched.

You can—and should—make use of your chosen keywords by naming any images appropriately and setting the titles and alt attributes to clearly describe what the image is.

4. Meta Descriptions

The meta description is the snippet of text that shows up below a listing in Google and other search engines. With WordPress, you can either explicitly declare a meta description with the use of a plugin such as WordPress SEO by Yoast or let Google decide what to use.

While the meta description itself has no weight when it comes to your search results placement, it can have a great deal of impact on whether or not someone clicks through to your site. Take care to write a compelling description that contains the keyword you want to be found for.

5. Inbound Links

As you’re creating new blog posts and pages on your site, it’s a good idea to link from one to another. This serves two purposes: it helps readers learn more about a subject, and it helps the search engines find and explore other content on your site. In both cases, it’s helpful to use keywords as the “anchor text” for these links. It’s a clear declaration to both human and non-human readers that the content linked to is about a specific subject.

6. Content

It should go without saying that including keywords in your content is important not only for search engines but for readers, too. But don’t make the mistake of using the same phrase over and over again. Doing so will turn your readers off.

Instead, use variations of your keyword throughout the text of your article. You won’t bore your readers, plus you’ll reinforce your main point with the search engines, which are now smart enough to recognize synonyms and rank your content accordingly.

Don’t worry if you don’t get your SEO perfect right out of the gate. It can take time to properly optimize a website for search—and some would argue that it’s a never-ending job—but do keep these 6 areas in mind for every post you make and your site will be much easier to find in a search.

Myths vs. Facts about the World’s Most Used Website Builder

For something so popular, there certainly are a lot of myths surrounding WordPress, its uses, and its viability in certain situations.
If you’re searching for a website solution for your coaching business, you’ve likely heard many stories—both pros and cons—about WordPress that have left you scratching your head in confusion. Here are some of the most common misconceptions, and what you really need to know.

Myth: WordPress is a Security Risk
Fans of static HTML sites like to drag this out as the reason for remaining stuck with difficult-to-manage sites. While WordPress is definitely less secure than HTML (that’s just the nature of php-driven websites) it is by no means the security risk some people would have you believe.

Fact: Good Security Practices Greatly Reduce Your Risk
Driving a car increases your risk of having an accident but that doesn’t mean you don’t drive. It just means you take steps to reduce your risk. WordPress is no different. With a few security measures in place, your risk of being hacked is nearly non-existent. To start:

  • Use strong passwords and change them often.
  • Never use “admin” as your username.
  • Create user accounts for your staff and give them only the permissions they need. Don’t make them administrators if they don’t need to be.
  • Choose a secure hosting environment.
  • Keep your site and its plugins and themes up to date.

Myth: WordPress is Difficult to Learn
Most often heard when discussing drag-and-drop website builders such as Wix, Squarespace, and Weebly, this myth is the one that keeps many people from even considering WordPress.

Fact: Every Website Builder has a Learning Curve
Yes, WordPress can be pretty overwhelming at first glance. But here’s the thing: any software that offers as much flexibility and versatility as WordPress does is bound to have a learning curve. And those other builders? They all have their own quirks and difficulties. The difference is that the WordPress community is huge and incredibly helpful. If you need to know how to do anything on a WordPress site, simply spending 30 seconds on YouTube or Google will reveal the answer.

Myth: WordPress is Only for Blogging
While it’s true that WordPress was originally developed as a blog platform, changes over the past several years have made it the ideal choice for a variety of website needs.

Fact: Plugins and Themes Make WordPress Work for Nearly Every Application
Whether you want to build an e-commerce site, a business directory, a membership site, a sales page, or a simple “brochure” style website, WordPress is designed to handle it. Thousands of plugins and specialty themes exist that extend its basic blogging functionality to encompass nearly anything you can dream of.

WordPress is by far the most commonly used content management system online today. That alone should reassure you that these myths are just that…myths. But don’t take my word for it. Try it out for yourself and I think you’ll agree.

Blogging Basics: How to Get More Eyes on Your Website

Get More Customers

The internet has an insatiable appetite for information. Billions of searches are conducted every single day looking for everything from how to bake an apple pie to why zebras have stripes. For anyone who conducts business online, these searches represent a steady flow of potential customers who are looking for what you have to offer.
A blog is an easy, cost-effective method of being found by the exact people who most need, want, and are willing to pay for your services. But only if you have a good strategy in place first.

Know Your Keywords
These are the search terms your ideal client is using to find answers to her questions. When you know what your keywords are, you can easily create blog posts that will:
• Attract the right visitors to your site
• Position you as the expert in your niche
• Make it easy for your ideal client to find—and get to know—you and your services

Write for People
While it’s important to know and use keywords in your blog posts, it’s even more important that you write your content with people in mind over search engines. Your blog should be engaging, informational, and even entertaining, but above all else, it must be readable.

Be Consistent
Content marketing—and blogging, by extension—is very much a numbers game. The more content you produce, the greater your results will be. That means setting—and sticking to—a content production schedule is a must.
For most websites, a weekly schedule is both attainable and sufficient to build a steady stream of traffic.

Keep Long-Term Goals in Mind
Blogging is not a fast business-growth strategy but it is excellent for long-term sustainability. Those posts you write this month will continue to work for you many years from now, bringing in more and more traffic and potential clients.

Use Good SEO Practices
Aside from keywords, great bloggers know there are many techniques you can use to bring in more readers, including:

  • Link out to authority sites from within your blog
  • Link internally to other, related content on your own sites
  • Use graphics and sub-headlines to break up long text passages
  • Take the time to write compelling meta descriptions
  • Create content that other sites will link to

Get the Word Out
Each new blog post is an opportunity to be seen, so take the time to share your content socially, and encourage your readers to do the same. Share your post on your Facebook page, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest and anywhere else your ideal client is likely to see it.

Mix It Up
Not every post has to be a 3,000-word article. Include other types of content as well, such as:

  • Video
  • Infographics
  • Curated content
  • Short opinion pieces
  • Audio

Have Fun with It
Above all else, have some fun. Inject your personality into your blog. Not only will you more easily attract your ideal client but you’ll enjoy blogging a lot more if you use your authentic voice. And the more you enjoy it, the more likely you will remain consistent as well.

Website Security 101: Keeping Your WordPress Site Safe from Hackers

Are security concerns keeping you from enjoying the flexibility and power of WordPress? If you’ve bought into the hype that WordPress is inherently unsecure, then you’re missing out on all the great things WordPress has to offer, for no good reason.
The fact is, while WordPress sites do get hacked, they are no more dangerous than other php-based websites. The problem is that WordPress is open source, which means that anyone can read the code—even the bad guys who spend all their time looking for vulnerabilities they can exploit. Couple that with the enormous popularity of WordPress, and it’s easy to see why you hear about hacks on a regular basis.
But that doesn’t mean WordPress is unsafe. By implementing just a few security best practices, you can greatly reduce your risk of being hacked.

Keep Your Site Up to Date
This is by far the biggest risk when it comes to security. New vulnerabilities are discovered in WordPress and its plugins and themes on a regular basis, and if your site is out of date, it is at risk. Hackers actively search for outdated websites they can attack, so make it a point to keep your site up to date. That includes plugins, themes, and the WordPress software itself.

Use Strong Passwords
Second only to out-of-date installations when it comes to inviting hackers, weak passwords are regularly exploited with a technique called a “brute force” attack. Simply put, a hacker sets a computer program to repeatedly attempt to log into your site using thousands of the most commonly used passwords and what are known as “dictionary” words.
This type of vulnerability can be easily avoided simply by choosing good passwords. Ideally, your passwords should:

  • Be-longer than 12 characters
  • Contain upper and lower case letters, numbers and symbols
  • Never be used for more than one site
  • Never be stored in plain text on your computer
  • Never be sent by email

Also, consider using a password manager such as LastPass to generate and securely store good, strong passwords. You’ll never have to worry about remembering your passwords, and you’ll greatly reduce your risk of being hacked.

Be Smart About Your Hosting
Unlimited domains! Unlimited space! Unlimited bandwidth! And all for around $8 per month. You’ve probably seen the claims and may even have a hosting account with one of these companies.
Here’s the problem. This type of shared hosting is inexpensive only because they overload their servers with thousands of websites. Just as close proximity in crowded classrooms allows human viruses to quickly spread, close proximity of websites on a shared server means one infected site is a risk to all the others.
Rather than looking for the least expensive (and riskiest) hosting option, choose a host that allows you to isolate each site on its own cPanel. Doing so will greatly improve the security of your website.
In the end, the safety and security of your site and its data is entirely up to you. Keep your software up to date, use good passwords, and choose a secure hosting environment, and you’ll be well ahead of the curve on this.

The Only Website Builder You’ll (Probably) Ever Need

In business? A website is a must have asset.

It’s where potential clients will find and get to know you. It’s the first place referrals will turn to learn more about you. It’s where you’ll sell your products and services, invite contact requests, brand yourself in your niche, and show off what you know. It might also be where you host your webinars, offer group coaching programs, publish a podcast, create a blog, and even set appointments with clients.

Whew!

That’s a lot of jobs for a single website to do. If you choose a versatile content management system such as WordPress though, you can easily incorporate those tasks and so much more.

Fast and Easy WordPress Setup

In the time it takes to finish your morning coffee, you can have a website created and live on the Internet using WordPress. Most hosting companies offer “one-click installs” for WordPress, meaning it will take only about 5 minutes to create your website. From there, it’s a matter of choosing a theme and adding content.

Even if you’re not technically inclined, WordPress is simple to use. And with a huge, helpful community of users, you can quickly find the answer for everything from “how do I install WordPress” to “how can I create a membership site” with just a Google search.

Your Site, WordPress Themes

With thousands of free and premium themes available, it’s easy to find a look that’s just right for your brand and business. Want something more customized? Many themes offer easy, drag-and-drop editing of layouts, colors and more, but if you want something designed just for you, there are thousands of capable developers to build you a custom design.

WordPress Plugins Add Greater Flexibility

Originally designed as a blogging platform, WordPress earned its early popularity by making this rather technical chore easy for thousands of new bloggers. Today it’s no longer known as just a blogging tool. Instead, site owners use WordPress as the basis for:

  • Sell Courses Online
  • Shopping carts
  • Membership sites
  • Sales pages
  • Wikis
  • Personal journals
  • Online directories
  • Non-profit fundraising
  • Video blogging
  • Podcasting
  • News sites
  • Recipe blogs
  • Photography sites
  • And dozens of others

The combination of themes and plugins—small software add-ons that install directly into your WordPress site—make the possibilities nearly endless, so no matter what you need a website to do, chances are good that WordPress can handle it.